22. Section 49A inserted After section 49 of the Principal Act, the following section is inserted in Division 6: 49A. Abatement notices (1) If a general manager is satisfied that a dog is creating a nuisance, the general manager may serve an abatement notice on the owner or person apparently in charge of the dog. (2) An abatement notice is to state – (a) the nature of the nuisance; and (b) any action to be taken that the general manager considers to be necessary to abate the nuisance; and (c) the period within which such action is to be taken. (3) A person served with an abatement notice must comply with the notice, unless the person lodges an appeal under subsection (5). Penalty: Fine not exceeding 20 penalty units. ($2,600) (4) For the purpose of ascertaining whether a nuisance exists, the general manager may – (a) enter and remain on land; and (b) do any thing reasonably necessary for that purpose. (5) A person served with an abatement notice may appeal to the Magistrates Court (Administrative Appeals Division) within 14 days after service of the notice on any one or more of the following grounds: (a) that a nuisance does not exist; (b) that an action required by the abatement notice is unreasonable; (c) that the period stated in the abatement notice is unreasonable. (6) The Magistrates Court (Administrative Appeals Division) may – (a) order that the person is to comply with the abatement notice; or (b) modify the abatement notice and order that the person and the council are to comply with the modified notice; or (c) order that the council withdraw the abatement notice. 24. Section 73 amended (Entering land) Section 73 of the Principal Act is amended by inserting after subsection (4) the following subsections: (5) Division 4 of Part 3 applies in respect of a dog seized under this section as if it were a dog at large. (6) If a dog is seized under this section, the relevant general manager must give the owner of the dog written notice stating – (a) the offence against this Act that it is alleged has been committed; and (b) any steps that the general manager requires to be undertaken before the dog is returned, to prevent the commission of the same or another offence against this Act; and (c) that the dog may be disposed of or destroyed if not claimed within 5 days after the date of the notice. The Tasmanian Parliament will probably debate this Bill in the Spring session Most of the bill proposes changes unrelated to barking such as microchipping and the treatment of dangerous dogs, elements beyond the province of Quiet Tasmania Only proposals of interest to those tormented by barking are reproduced in the panel on the right, below ...